Learn Worbla for props, costumes, and cosplay on Feb. 21st!

Cosplay-in-progress: D3 Demon Hunter by Lightning Cosplay, from Worbla.com

Lightning Cosplay’s finished D3 Demon Hunter cosplay, from Worbla.com.

SATURDAY, FEB. 21st – WORBLA I @ 11:30AM. WORBLA II COMING IN MARCH. WORBLA I IS A PREREQUISITE FOR OUR MORE ADVANCED THERMOPLASTIC CLASSES. CALL 951-266-6630 TO REGISTER.

People have seen “Worbla” pop up on our class calendar a few times now, and it leaves most people wondering what
it is and what they can do with it. Worbla is a thermoplastic that comes in various sized sheets. It’s become a popular material for people who cosplay, because ease of use makes creating realistic looking armor and props a snap. But it is also used for making sculptures, toys, masks, and jewelry.

Using it can be simple once you learn the basics and get a bit of practice: create a paper pattern (whether it is
for a Halloween costume, scroll work for a walking stick, or a pendant to be worn on a necklace) and trace the pattern onto the Worbla with a Sharpie marker or a pen. Use scissors or a hot knife to cut the pattern out of the Worbla. Using a heat gun, you can then apply heat to shape the thermoplastic to the desired form.

Students creating arm bracers during a previous Worbla I session.


Once you have the pieces formed to match what you imagined with the original paper pattern, it is time to apply finishing techniques. Worbla can be layered, sanded, textured, hot glued, and painted with a variety of mediums from acrylic to spray paint. When the Worbla is still warm you can gently press items into it to create a desired pattern or texture. Or, when it is completely cooled, you can sand it down to the desired smoothness.

We can teach you the hands-on basics of working with Worbla – from designing a pattern, to making the proper cut of the material, heat gun and pressure techniques to mold the Worbla, and how to correctly layer – on February 21st in our WORBLA I class.
To sign up for these or any of our other Cosplay Workshop Weekend classes, call 951.266.6630.

Here are some examples of arm bracers completed by Vocademy students during previous Worbla I classes.
























Another Worbla work-in-progress. This Elder Scrolls Emperor armor is designed and built by The Tragic Shrew:


 






A feathered shoulder pauldron by Bambi Cosplay:


















Check out more examples and get inspired at Worbla!

This week’s classes includes Cosplay Workshop Weekend ~ 02/17 – 02/22

All classes listed with purple text are Cosplay Workshop Weekend classes. Buy 1, Get 2nd class 50% off!


Tuesday, Feb. 17th
DIT Tuesday @ 6pm
Electronics & Robotics Introduction @ 6:30pm (FREE)

Wednesday, Feb. 18th
Machine & Shop Safety @ 6pm

Friday, Feb. 20th
Hand Tools, Power Tools, & Abrasives @ 6pm
Silicone Mold Making & Resin Casting I @ 6:30pm

Saturday, Feb. 21st
Worbla I @ 11:30am
Autodesk Fusion 360 CAD II @ 1pm
Chainmaille & Scalemaille Basics @ 3pm
Cosplay Open Collaboration @ 6:30pm (FREE)

Sunday, Feb. 22nd
Electronics Basics @ 11:30am
Machine Sewing Basics @ 11:30am
Silicone Mold Making & Resin Casting II @ 12pm
3D Printing Basics @ 1pm
Laser Cutting Basics II @ 1:30pm
Vacuforming Basics @ 4pm

CALL 951-266-6630 TO REGISTER FOR ANY OF THESE CLASSES.

Congressman Takano published, championing the Maker Movement for American Economy

Vocademy electronics instructor, Kay Yang. Kay is also creator of an upcoming product named Tinker, The Robot aimed at teaching children ages 6+ about robotics. The Kickstarter is coming soon!


Congressman Mark Takano, representative of California’s 41st District and founder of the Congressional Maker Caucus, has just published an article through Medium that makes a strong and concise case for the importance of the Maker Movement in relation to the American economy.

It was a visit to Vocademy that first sparked my interest in the Maker Movement, a tech-focused social initiative built around trying, failing, tinkering, innovating, and then sharing lessons learned along the way. Participants come from a kaleidoscope of backgrounds and experiences, including artisans and engineers, students and chefs, software developers and musicians. What they all have in common is a driving interest to innovate.
We’re proud to have someone like Congressman Takano on our side. Read the full article.